Hungry humpbacks: New surveys show an abundance of humpback whales on their South Atlantic feeding grounds following whaling ban

OLTD

This post originally appeared at News – British Antarctic Survey

A whale swimming under waterHumpback whale populations are strongly recovering on their feeding grounds in the South Atlantic, with over 24,543 whales now estimated to use polar waters in the Scotia Arc each summer. ...

Read More - Source: News – British Antarctic Survey

When Wild Animals Misbehave

This article appeared first at Outside Magazine: Culture

When Wild Animals Misbehave
Every day, critters all around the planet break human laws. They steal food and destroy our stuff. They kill. And, naturally, humans take it upon ourselves to intervene—often with all kinds of unfortunate consequences. For this episode, fearless journalist Mary Roach shares wild tales from her new b...

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Why Thinking About Death Makes Us Happier

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Why Thinking About Death Makes Us Happier
In the United States, we rarely think about death—especially our own death. And when we do, it tends to make us sad and uncomfortable. But there are powerful benefits to regularly contemplating the fact that our time in this world will eventually come to an end. The shift in perspective can be profo...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Health

Why Sprinters Peak in the Evening and Marathoners Don’t

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Why Sprinters Peak in the Evening and Marathoners Don’t
Most track and field world records are set in the evening; most road running world records are set in the morning. This is not a deep physiological riddle—it’s just a reflection of when big track meets and road races are held. For mass-participation endurance events, in particular, early start times...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Health

Finally, Evidence that Maurten’s Hydrogel Drink Works

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Finally, Evidence that Maurten’s Hydrogel Drink Works
Back in 2019, I wrote an article titled “The World’s Hottest Sports Drink Faces the Evidence.” The Swedish company Maurten’s hydrogel-carbohydrate drink had swept through the endurance sports world like a highly transmissible viral variant—but the first few independent studies had failed to find any...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Health

Nature Is Medicine. But What’s the Right Dose?

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Nature Is Medicine. But What’s the Right Dose?
The corporate origin story is almost perfect. Once upon a time, a data guy, a software guy, and an environmental physiologist met on a hut-to-hut ski traverse of Oregon’s Three Sisters Wilderness. Snowy chutes under bluebird skies by day, then starry nights in rustic huts stocked with Bend’s finest ...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Health

The Unexpected Joys of a Shabby Wildflower Guide

This post appeared originally at Outside Magazine: Adventure

The Unexpected Joys of a Shabby Wildflower Guide
I first heard of the book seven years ago from Jack Turner, a bioregional essayist and retired Exum Mountain Guide living in Wyoming, at the foot of the Teton Range. He was talking about Henry David Thoreau—specifically, how climate scientists utilize Thoreau’s two-million-word journal from the 1850...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Adventure

Our Favorite Gear For a Better Night’s Sleep

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Our Favorite Gear For a Better Night’s Sleep
For ­millennia, professional athletes and regular folks alike have sought to maximize the benefit of a seemingly basic function: sleep. Getting quality z’s—or not—can ­affect risk of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. No wonder that the sleep-aid industry is projected to reach $112.7 billion by 2...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Health

Why Endurance Athletes Should Consider Single-Leg Training

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Why Endurance Athletes Should Consider Single-Leg Training
Back in 1961, a pair of researchers at the University of California published the first scientific description of what became known as the “bilateral strength deficit.” The gist is that your right and left limbs, working separately, are stronger than when you use both limbs at the same time. The 196...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Health

Toxic Algal Blooms Are Growing Out of Control

This post appeared originally at Outside Magazine: Adventure

Toxic Algal Blooms Are Growing Out of Control
On the Fourth of July last year, an hour after playing in the North Fork of the Virgin River in Utah’s Zion National Park, a healthy five-month-old husky puppy started seizing and then died. Local health officials determined that the dog, named Keanna, had swallowed toxic algae from the river. The P...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Adventure

Eliud Kipchoge Is the GOAT. What Makes Him So Good?

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Health

Eliud Kipchoge Is the GOAT. What Makes Him So Good?
This article was first published by PodiumRunner.com. To get more of their premium content along with your Outside subscription, join Outside+.
With his seemingly effortless victory in the Olympic Marathon steambath in Japan, Eliud Kipchoge ended the debate. There’s no longer any question that he’s...

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National Parks Are Embracing Indigenous Astronomy

This post appeared first at Outside Magazine: Travel

National Parks Are Embracing Indigenous Astronomy
Spotting Orion or Ursa Major is a highlight of any camping trip, but Greek constellations aren’t the only stories scattered among the stars. For millennia, Native Americans have used the cosmos for everything from weather prediction to navigation. Only in the past few decades, though, has Indigenous...

Read More - Source: Outside Magazine: Travel